a parliament of owls

Aug 20

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Hello followers. The moon must be blue, because it is time for those very infrequent fanfic recs! The fandom of choice this time? Welcome to Night Vale.

Ain’t Filled with Gentle Things by neveralarch

A typical PTA meeting in Night Vale. You know, glow cloud possession, picking senior prom decorations, fistfights over grammar, the usual. 

This is a wonderful exploration of the relationships between Carlos and Cecil and Steve Carlsburg. Amusing and fun and polyamorous. Fabulous!

Second Date by thingswithwings

Listeners, we are very lucky tonight to have a guest in the studio. Carlos, our local scientist and utterly beautiful investigator of strange phenomena is here with us. Carlos, would you like to say hi to everyone at home?

Carlos is shaking his head no, perhaps because he is too shy to go on the radio – isn’t that adorable, listeners? Anyway, Carlos is here to keep me company before we head out on our second date, the location and activities of which Carlos has kept secret from me, though I know I will be delighted by whatever he chooses for us to do, provided that it is within the bounds of municipal regulations on second dates.

This is a complete episode of WtNV and it is absolutely pitch perfect. It is available in textual and audio form, so you can actually listen to it if you like. All the tiny details down to the traffic and the message from a sponsor are what really make this fic excellent.

How I Survived My Summer Vacation, by Tamika Flynn, Age 12 3/4 by thingswithwings

The first book on Tamika Flynn’s Summer Reading Program Sticker Chart is Lord of the Flies.

She doesn’t really like it.

This fic is amazing. It pushes my nostalgia buttons for so many of the required summer reading books that I was subjected to for school. The interpretation of Night Vale’s librarians is fantastic. (I highly recommend this for my fellow students of library science.) And we see Tamika’s harrowing origin story, with children working together and exploring literary themes — wonderful.

He Says He Is An Experimental Theologian by SailorPtah

Ever since Carlos was little, he and his daemon have been fans of Dr. Lyra Belacqua. Both as the most groundbreaking experimental theologian of the 20th century, and as the heroine of dozens of fantasy-adventure children’s stories (based very loosely on her own mysterious childhood).

But Lyra’s true legacy is still bigger than Carlos ever imagined…until he took a team of scholars to study Rusakov particles in the most theologically interesting community in Hispania Nova. Now his own day-to-day life is full of things like angels, witches, hooded spectres, portals between worlds, vague yet menacing branches of the Magisterium, and a man who walks around without his daemon and can read an alethiometer as easily as a stop sign.

Oh. My. God. His Dark Materials AUs are one of my many weaknesses and this is a true HDM AU. Not just a “they all have daemons” AU (which is great, don’t get me wrong), this is Night Vale in the modern day world of Lyra Belacqua. The level and detail of the world-building is mind-blowing. And the length… the word count is over 180,000, so this is basically a novel. And it’s the first of a series. Fair warning, this fic is complete, but the third in this series is still a WIP.

I am in love, basically. If you enjoy HDM AUs, I cannot recommend this highly enough. It is by far the best one I have ever read.

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Anonymous said: How do you feel when it comes down to someone of a non-Native American background wearing the Native American headdress for fashion or as a costume?

endgaem:

scalpthelie:

endgaem:

I do feel like this is a good example of legitimate cultural appropriation, because the headdress is given specifically to war honoured Plains Indians.  It would be the equivalent of giving a civilian the Purple Heart medal, in that it is something that is earned, rather than something that is just given. And it is worn with pride and honour, and oftentimes, as the first link states, it used to be worn into battle.

So people just wearing it as a fashion statement is, in my opinion, disrespectful. With things like dreadlocks or bindi, however, those would not be examples of cultural appropriation, mainly because they are already worn as fashion statements by the people who belong to those cultures and have no sacred value religiously or otherwise.

Wearing a headdress is not “analogous to casually wearing a Purple Heart or Metal of Honor that was not earned.”

1. The analogy is comparing apple to oranges.  The Medal of Honor was created by the U.S. Congress and its use is restricted by law. It is for an act of valor while in action against an enemy.  At the time of this writing only 3,465 medals have been awarded to 3,446 different people.  Hardly anyone has earned more than one Medal of Honor.

Nowadays, an eagle feather can be given for brave deeds whether you are in the military or not. Or, maybe you get one when you become an adult or graduate college, or for good deeds to the community, etc…. A headdress can have up to 31 or more eagle feathers.  That is a lot of honors.  Not to take anything away from the honor of receiving an eagle feather for the bonnet but it is clearly not the same thing as receiving the Medal of Honor.  And, isn’t it insulting to say otherwise?

2.  Non-Indians are basically forced to wear imitation (tourist) headdress—they are not real war bonnets.  They are not made with sacred eagle feathers.  According the US law, only Native Americans are authorized to posses eagle feathers.

A non-Indian wearing an imitation headdress is more analogous to casually wearing a custom medal in the shape of your home state, which is then inscribed with your name on it.

Yes, they both look like medals.  However, anyone familiar with the Medal of Honor would not be offended if you wore the Texas one.  If you are a Native American who holds the eagle feather and the bonnets made from them sacred, you should know a hipster in a headdress is not the same thing (and they are not trying to be).

3.  This brings us to the “Restricted Symbols” argument where certain symbols (i.e. military medals, bachelor degrees, etc..) can’t be legitimately possessed by just anyone.  Some Native Americans claim the headdress is a restricted item and wearing an imitation is akin to forging a medical degree to get a job as a doctor when you are not qualified.

Wearing tourist headdresses is not the same thing as forging a degree or sticking fake medals on your uniform for the purpose of tricking people or pretending to have earned these symbols.  I don’t think many individuals (if any) are “forging” a war bonnet in order to claim benefits inherent with the symbol.

 4.  This is beside the point, but how d you know the circumstances of how an individual [outside the Indian community] acquired their imitation headdress?  It could have been given by relatives for the good deeds one has done.  Or, maybe it was earned in some other way particular to that individuals micro-culture within his family or group.

Thank you for the calm and intelligent explanation. Really, I appreciate it.

seashellies:

nethilia:

murdorito:

ankankimatank:

dollymacabre:

mszombi:

fleurdulys:

The Irritating Gentleman - Berthold Woltze
1874

I know that feel, Painting Lady. 

My bus ride to and from work every day.

They never published the second picture, which was the one where she backhanded him in the fucking face for getting all up in her shit.

Oh great, good to know this has been a problem for HUNDREDS OF YEARS CAN WE PLEASE STOP DOING THIS ALREADY JUST FUCK OFF AND LEAVE ME ALONE

Everyone is overlooking something very significant in this picture, that I saw in two seconds, that adds a layer of super slime to his whole awful attitude. “The Irritating Gentleman” is a politeness.
She’s wearing all black in 1874. Black gloves, hat, cloak, and dress. In public. The whole nine yards. That’s not a fashion choice or a gothic thing. Back then when people wore all black like that, they were in mourning for someone who died. No one did mourning like the Victorians, that shit was an art form to them.
Someone in her family has died—she could even be a young widow. No one’s accompanying her either. With the carpet bag? She’s traveling alone while still in deep mourning. Look at the closeup. She’s got tears in her eyes. She is upset, devastated in a way that one is only when someone has died. And the guy’s still bothering her, like her problems are flippant bullshit and she needs to just smile or pay attention to him because ladies are supposed to be pleasing for men no matter what shit they’re going through. That’s not a look of “what an ass.” That’s a look of devastation that even in her pain, she’s expected to give people like him focus. She’s not mad. She’s hurt. And to add insult to injury? Everyone would be able to tell. It was a clear sign and still is in ways that someone is mourning, to dress in black crepe like that. He would know why she’s wearing all black, and he’s still demanding her attention.
What an insufferable dick.
At least I’m not the only one who saw this.

I think what gets me most about this painting are the tears in her eyes.

seashellies:

nethilia:

murdorito:

ankankimatank:

dollymacabre:

mszombi:

fleurdulys:

The Irritating Gentleman - Berthold Woltze

1874

I know that feel, Painting Lady. 

My bus ride to and from work every day.

They never published the second picture, which was the one where she backhanded him in the fucking face for getting all up in her shit.

Oh great, good to know this has been a problem for HUNDREDS OF YEARS CAN WE PLEASE STOP DOING THIS ALREADY JUST FUCK OFF AND LEAVE ME ALONE

Everyone is overlooking something very significant in this picture, that I saw in two seconds, that adds a layer of super slime to his whole awful attitude. “The Irritating Gentleman” is a politeness.

She’s wearing all black in 1874. Black gloves, hat, cloak, and dress. In public. The whole nine yards. That’s not a fashion choice or a gothic thing. Back then when people wore all black like that, they were in mourning for someone who died. No one did mourning like the Victorians, that shit was an art form to them.

Someone in her family has died—she could even be a young widow. No one’s accompanying her either. With the carpet bag? She’s traveling alone while still in deep mourning. Look at the closeup. She’s got tears in her eyes. She is upset, devastated in a way that one is only when someone has died. And the guy’s still bothering her, like her problems are flippant bullshit and she needs to just smile or pay attention to him because ladies are supposed to be pleasing for men no matter what shit they’re going through. That’s not a look of “what an ass.” That’s a look of devastation that even in her pain, she’s expected to give people like him focus. She’s not mad. She’s hurt. And to add insult to injury? Everyone would be able to tell. It was a clear sign and still is in ways that someone is mourning, to dress in black crepe like that. He would know why she’s wearing all black, and he’s still demanding her attention.

What an insufferable dick.

At least I’m not the only one who saw this.

I think what gets me most about this painting are the tears in her eyes.

(via lordfarraringtonthe3rd)

doctorcanon:

cmcross:

No, you don’t understand.
This actually happens.
We got a 16 year old boy on our unit once, because Pediatrics was full, and it’s about 1 in the morning and all the nurses are at the nurses station having a break and we’re  all talking and having a laugh and then all of a sudden this kids heart monitor just goes CRAZY.
So we call the code and I grab the crash cart and about 6 of us just take off running down the hall and we bust in the room and this kid is just sitting there with his hand around his junk looking MORTIFIED.
So we just sort of backed out of the room quietly, walked calmly to the stairwell, and had a total and complete hysterical breakdown.
It was the funniest shit ever.

Omigod so many nurses have told me stories like these. 

doctorcanon:

cmcross:

No, you don’t understand.

This actually happens.

We got a 16 year old boy on our unit once, because Pediatrics was full, and it’s about 1 in the morning and all the nurses are at the nurses station having a break and we’re  all talking and having a laugh and then all of a sudden this kids heart monitor just goes CRAZY.

So we call the code and I grab the crash cart and about 6 of us just take off running down the hall and we bust in the room and this kid is just sitting there with his hand around his junk looking MORTIFIED.

So we just sort of backed out of the room quietly, walked calmly to the stairwell, and had a total and complete hysterical breakdown.

It was the funniest shit ever.

Omigod so many nurses have told me stories like these. 

(Source: textsfromwhedonverse, via lordfarraringtonthe3rd)

Aug 19

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Have you ever wondered where books come from?

zwischendenstuehlen:

Well then, let me show you, because that’s what I do for a living.

Right now, it’s this time of the year, and the little ones have just freshly hatched:

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You’ll notice they’re still blind and naked when they hatch. So I make them little coats to keep them warm during their first winter:

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See how they happily line up to put them on:

image

See? Better. Now they’re ready to go and explore the world.

image

And if they make it through the winter and we take good care of them, they will grow up to be strong and wise like their older fellows:

image

So, in case you were ever wondering, now you know.

(via holyjambatman)

Aug 18

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